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It’s Employee Appreciation Day!

So often employees rate their performance on whether or not they are given a pay raise or a promotion. While an employer handing out pay raises and promotions does in fact indicate that the employee is doing a good job, employers must not forget that employees need to be recognized more often than a raise or promotion can be given. To be recognized and rewarded is to value your employees, to realize that they are human beings, and to provide them with appreciation by listening to what they really need. Putting aside the wanting of a raise or a higher title, here are five things your employees need:

  1. A pleasant work environment.
    • A hostile work environment is just not healthy. If co-workers aren’t being respected, no one is going to feel of value. HR Strategies provides the HR consulting that is often needed to balance complex professional working relationships.
  2. Recognition
    • How about an employee of the month award? Or a company-wide email about the latest accomplishment of your employee?
  3. Perks
    • Do you have discounts that your employees can utilize? All worksite employees of HR Strategies have access to perks program discounts for a variety of establishments including the GA Aquarium, Six Flags, the Braves, Stone Mountain Park, and many more.
  4. Help/Personal Assistance
    • Is your company culture that of genuine sincerity for a co-worker/employees personal problems? An employee’s life outside of the office can greatly affect their productivity on the job. All HR Strategies worksite employees have access to our EAP program, which provides a variety of services to help ensure their overall wellbeing.
  5. Mentoring
    • Do managers listen to their employee’s professional goals, and give them the coaching they need to move toward those goals? Thus showing the employee value? Do you provide your employees the training they need to accomplish their work tasks?

Employees are not just a time clock badge ID number. They are human and have emotional needs to be met. Taking the time to provide for these needs you may find that they become more productive and better representatives of your business.

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The First 3 Months… Tips to Help Get Them Right

3 Months, or 90 Days, is the typical length of time for a new employee to integrate into a new organization. Below are some tips and guidelines to help your new employees make that integration successful.

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Before Their First Day…

  • They’ve been hired, but haven’t started yet; start their working relationship off on a positive note by sending a Welcome Letter, or leaving a welcome note on their work station to find on their first day.
  • Make sure the employee has their entire new hire packet to be filled out and turned in on the first day of employment. Pay special attention to the I-9 and provide the list of acceptable I-9 documents. Bonus points if you are using HR Strategies electronic on-boarding, they can access it online!
  • Be sure to set up their office/workstation so that they are ready to go the first day they arrive. Make sure any technology is set for them; this includes computer access and phones; but it also includes all online accounts having access, user IDs, etc.

Their First Day….

  • Make sure the receptionist or your office manager knows they will be starting, and who will be assisting the new employee.
  • Give the employee a tour of the workplace. Be sure to include not only where they can find other employees who will be vital to their job, but also restrooms, breakrooms, supplies, and other essentials.
  • Provide the new employee not only with a handbook, but also a telephone directory for the company and a user guide for the phone system.
  • Everyone likes gifts, and this is the perfect time to welcome your new hire with some office “swag”. Having some new items with the company logo will help the employee feel a part of the organization, and it’s a marketing bonus for our company when they show their swag to others outside of the organization!
  • No one likes to be alone on their first day, arrange to have their supervisor take them to lunch. You may want to even have a few other employees from their department join the lunch. Maybe even plan a lunch at the office/work area and order pizza for the employees so they can better get to know the new hire.

Week Two…

  • They should now be familiar with their department, and their co-workers within their department. Two weeks into their employment is a great time to make sure that they are meeting employees from other departments.
  • Have them begin to set goals with their manager, and when those goals should be reached.

After Week Two…

  • Supervisors should be sure to check in with the employee to see how they are progressing.
  • The new employee and their supervisor should have a conversation regarding any concerns the employee is having, and for the supervisor to get a feel of how the employee is beginning to transition into their role. Any concerns that the employee has, should be addressed and a plan of resolution put in place following this meeting.

One Month…

  • Ask the employee for their input on the new hire process and how you may improve it.
  • Discuss with the employee their performance progress.  Address questions, give feedback on overall performance and your observations of their work.  Address any concerns as coaching is given and set expectations of future performance review process and adjust behaviors as needed.
  • Now is the time to start getting the employee involved in short term projects.

Month and a Half….

  • Be sure to check with the employee and their supervisor on any outstanding concerns the employee may have regarding their employment/work.
  • Assess the employees understanding of their role.

3 Months…

  • At 3 months into employment the employee should be fully engaged in the company and their role.
  • Now is the time to do a first review; give additional feedback on their performance, address any concerns, and set strategic goals for them.
  • Make sure that you ask if there is any reason why they would want to leave the company’s employment.

For questions regarding On-Boarding, New Hires, or any other part of the Employee Life Cycle contact HR Strategies at 770-339-0000 or http://www.hr-strategies.com.

 

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