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Negative Social Media Comments by Employees

Social Media Dislike

Employers have a myriad of questions and concerns about employees use of Social Media, especially when it comes to limiting what an employee may say about the company. No employer wants negative comments about their product, or their employment policies and procedures, put out for the world to see. However, as our world has become more entrenched with social media, disgruntled employees are able to easily reach a wide audience through various avenues of not only their own posting, but their followers/friends then re-posting any thoughts that they may have.

It is important that employers know the rules regarding social media and their employees use of such, and there are plenty of laws that surround an employees rights when it comes to social media.

A recent blog post by Eric B. Meyer, on The Employer Handbook blog, discussed a concluding opinion of a NLRB Administrative Law Judge that addressed negative tweets about employment matters by an employee, and whether or not the Employer could make the employee delete the tweets. The answer is No. “Section 7 protects employees’ right to engage in concerted activities for the purpose of mutual aid or protection”….The tweets concerned wages and working conditions and are protected matters. The issues raised were not purely individual concerns, but  issues common to many employees. “Concerted activities include individual activity where “individual employees seek to initiate or to induce or to prepare for group action, as well as individual employees bringing truly group complaints to the attention of management.”

“How can employers avoid this problem? Look, employees are going to talk about work. Count on it. And a blanket ban on social media discussions about work would violate the National Labor Relations Act. But, you can — and should — encourage your employees to address work issues directly with co-workers, supervisors, HR, other decisionmakers. In most situations, this direct communication is a more effective way to address workplace issues and resolve problems, than venting on social media.”

Source: Can you force an employee to delete critical tweets about the company? NLRB says no.

Staying Focused at Work….

The brain is a wonderful organ; it starts working the moment you get up in the morning and does not stop until you get into the office.

-Robert Frost

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13 Ways to Beat Distractions and Stay Focused at Work

  • Pinpoint the problem. What causes you to lose focus? Is it fatigue, hunger or a Twitter addition? Figuring out the issue is the first step toward trying to fix it.
  • Plan ahead. Envision what the workday will look like before it happens. Write down what things need to get done or what you want to accomplish. Setting goals can help people stay on track.
  • Eat a good breakfast. A bowl of oatmeal may do more than jump start metabolism. Studies have found that eating breakfast can improve attention and concentration, too. Here’s what the experts say you should eat in the morning.
  • Meditate. Scientists have discovered that meditation may enhance certainbrain functions linked to attention. It can’t hurt to try shutting everything off to get more done in the long run.
  • Work offline. One survey found nearly 60% of disruptions at work come from email, social networks and cell phones. So for tasks that don’t involve the Internet, try using old-fashioned paper and pen — perfect for brainstorming! Put your phone on silent and check email only occasionally (try once every hour). Limit time on social media too. You can “like” your friend’s picture of his dog later.
  • Do smaller tasks. Some psychologists suggest that our brain works way too hard to process incredible amounts of information. So working on one large project can be overwhelming — like trying to plan a whole event at work in one afternoon. Split up projects into individual tasks so they’re easier to accomplish.
  • Time box. Work on one project for a specific amount of time, rather than working until something is finished. (Write emails until 2 p.m., instead of stopping at inbox zero.) This way we know we can work hard until a certain time, and then be able to take a break.
  • Clean up. Anything from Post-Its to pretzels and family photos can become a distraction. Clear off the workspace and have out only what’s needed (laptop, notebook, water-bottle — check!) to help stay in the zone.
  • Try an app. Discard anydistractions with a little help from technology. Certain apps can block websites (so long, Pinterest) or black out computer screen backgrounds so only one program is in view at a time. There are web tools that can calculate how much time is spent on websites, too. (Now that could be scary.)
  • Reward yourself. A little motivation can go a long way. Say, “After I finish this page, I’ll go buy a cookie!” (Try these vegan delicacies.) Watch that to-do list vanish in no time.
  • Take little breaks. Getting to the office early, working through lunch and staying late doesn’t necessarily mean getting more stuff done. Short bursts of hard work followed by quick breaks can be more beneficial than never taking a breather, since the brain may just burn out.
  • Wear headphones. At Greatist we practice the “headphone rule”: no one’s allowed to talk to someone who’s wearing ear gear. It’s a great way to show you’re working on something important and don’t have time to chat. (Sometimes I don’t even have music playing — my secret!)
  • Try caffeine. Coffee or tea may help people feel more alert and able to concentrate in the cubicle. If iced coffee isn’t your cup of…coffeetry chewing gum, which may help increase alertness too.

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/07/23/13-ways-to-beat-distractions-and-stay-focused-at-work/#ixzz2IdCsgOf9

Phishing Scams – Remain Vigilant With Your Personal Data

social security

It’s Tax Time and this year there are several new phishing schemes to try and obtain your personal data during Tax preparation season. One of the newest is a phishing scheme via email, asking you to update your e-services information with the IRS.

The IRS Security Awareness Tax Tip Number 5 reminds us that “E-services will never ask you to do this. If you receive an email or requests like this, do not click on the links or take any other action. It is important to keep in mind the IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels. Never click on strange emails or links seeking updated information.”

Furthermore and “especially in families that use the same computer, students should be warned against turning off any security software in use or opening any suspicious emails. They should be instructed to never click on embedded links or download attachments of emails from unknown sources.”

For more tips on talking to your family about security online and at home, visit https://www.irs.gov/uac/Talk-to-Your-Family-about-Security-Online-and-at-Home

June is National Safety Month and the Dog Days of Summer are Upon Us

With the dog days of summer upon us, employers with outside workplaces should heed OSHA’s focus on the hazards of working in high heat. OSHA has produced a great deal of public information about heat-related illness, including a dedicated heat illness information page on OSHA’s website, a YouTube video, public press statements, speeches by senior Department of Labor and OSHA officials, and even a Heat Safety Smartphone App. Click Here to Check Out More Info! 

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Management Training Series on June 4th, 2015

HR Strategies, a Human Resource firm, continues to boost and expand their client’s knowledge of important management strategies and business regulations through their Management Training Series.

Furnishing top-notch management training sessions to their clients affords HR Strategies to prepare their client’s for a variety of workplace regulations, as well as to deliver the support needed to foster and promote a sound workplace. HR Strategies has recently announced that their latest training session, to be held on June 4th, 2015, will be presented by Tracie Maurer, an attorney at the prestigious law firm Jackson Lewis LLP, and will cover many facets of the EEOC and how to protect your workplace from the rise in EEOC lawsuits. The specific topics will include: What is happening in legal cases in reference to the EEOC, Types of Claims Won, Age Discrimination, Disability Discrimination, the ADA & the FLSA, How a PEO can help in matters pertaining to the EEOC, and Wage & Hour.

As always the training session is completely free for clients, who can expect to enjoy a top of the line speaker along with a delicious catered lunch compliments of HR Strategies. The Management Training Series proves to be another way that HR Strategies bestows the value of HR outsourcing to their client companies.

Wear Red Day

1 in 3 women die of heart disease and stroke each year. Celebrate National Wear Red Day with Go Red For Women on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015 to help save women’s lives. Join the movement nationwide and learn how you can honor women like you on this important day by clicking the words below. “

wear red day

Cardiovascular Disease

Though the “heart” is often thought of in terms of love and Valentines during February, it is also American Heart Month, in terms of Heart Health and cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of men and women in the United States, and is the leading cause of disability as well. Cardiovascular Disease prevents many from enjoying family activities and from working! According to the CDC, Cardiovascular disease costs the United States over $300 billion a year in healthcare services, medications, and lost work productivity.

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How do we, as employees, prevent loss of work productivity due to Cardiovascular Disease? By controlling and managing our diet, physical activity, tobacco use, obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and diabetes in order to prevent and combat Cardiovascular Disease.

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