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Tomorrow is Saint Patrick’s Day!

Rivers will be died green. Parades will happen. Kids will be waking up tomorrow and remembering to wear their green, so they can go to school and be a pincher and not a pinchee! Adults may be flocking to their local establishments to partake in adult beverages.

It will be a festive and fun day for many as we keep an eye out for leprechauns. But if we aren’t careful, our Pot O’ Gold, may suffer by not following some simple tips for Saint Patrick’s Day when it comes to work.

1. No Green Beer

Simply put: alcohol and work do not mix. So save the green beer and Jameson for your personal time after hours! A green tinted non-alcoholic punch or drink would be a great way to celebrate with your co-workers!

2. Costumes

Be mindful of what you are representing when picking out your attire. It is always imperative that your attire stays within the realms of your company’s dress code. That being said, why not sport a green top, tie, or socks?

3. No Pinching Zone

Legend has it that if you don’t wear green on St. Paddy’s Day then you get pinched. This is one thing that we need to leave in the school yard. No green pinch is worth a sexual harassment claim!

4. Irish Flu

The day after St. Paddy’s Day has long been a day of high absenteeism. As an employee, do you have a PTO day you can schedule? As a boss, are you prepared for scheduling problems?

With those for things in mind, be ready to sport your shamrocks, eat your corned beef and cabbage, and have a festive day!

st patricks day hat

It’s Walk to Work Day

walk to workAccording to About.com, National Walk to Work Day is held the first Friday of April in the USA, beginning in 2004. The day is promoted by Prevention magazine and endorsed by the US Department of Health and Human Services and the American Podiatric Medical Association.

The following are snippets from the article:

How to Participate:

You are encouraged to walk for all or part of your commute to work. Aim for a minimum 15 minute walk each way. If you take public transportation, try walking to a further stop before boarding, or getting off a stop early and walking the rest of the distance to work. If your commute is too long, make it a Walk to Lunch Day. Invite your co-workers to join with you for Walk to Work Day, or join you in a Walk to Lunch.

The Goal – Add Healthy Steps to Your Day:

Walking for 30-60 minutes a day greatly reduces your risk of dying from heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. By finding a way to make walking part of each day, you are giving yourself proven health benefits far beyond any promised by herbs, vitamins, or prescription drugs.

Walking for 30 minutes a day as part of your work commute or lunch puts you into the “Moderate Physical Activity” category and greatly lowers your health risks.

Dressing for Walking:

Your walking shoes should be comfortable for walking for 15-30 minutes at a stretch. If your work shoes don’t work for walking, wear athletic shoes and carry along your work shoes to change into. For April, dress for the weather with a jacket (water-resistant, with hood in rainy climates). Carry your necessary papers, purse, etc. in a small backpack.

Use a Pedometer and Stop Weight Gain: 

A pedometer can motivate you to log more steps each day. Experts say if we all added 2000 more steps to our day, we wouldn’t gain another pound.

To read the full article, click here.

As we’ve mentioned before, HR Strategies’ internal employees are wearing pedometers for the HumanaVitality health and wellness program! How can you help your office become a healthier place?

Earth Day Timeline

Established in 1970, Earth Day has become a worldwide holiday celebrated by over 1 billion people in 2010. Galvanized by the mounting evidence of environmental damage due to pollution and inspired by the student organizations protesting the Vietnam War, Earth Day was conceived by Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, who wanted a new way to educate people about protecting the Earth. Discover more about the history of Earth Day, the events that influenced it and the progress made in the years since its inception.

June 4, 1916: Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson born in Clear Lake, Wisconsin. Nelson, a World War II veteran, served in the Wisconsin State Senate and as the Badger State’s governor before being elected to the U.S. Senate in 1962.

1962: Rachel Carson publishes Silent Spring. The best seller sounded an alarm about the potential dangers and consequences of widespread pesticide use, and helped raise the environmental consciousness of the American public.

1963: Senator Nelson accompanies President John F. Kennedy on a speaking tour around the U.S. to raise awareness about environmental issues; however, protecting the environment remains a low priority for most politicians and citizens.

1969: Chemical waste released into Cleveland’s Cuyahoga River causes it to catch fire. The event becomes symbolic of how industrial pollution is damaging America’s natural resources.

1969: Inspired by the “teach-ins” held by Vietnam War protestors on U.S. college campuses, Senator Gaylord Nelson announces the idea for Earth Day, a large-scale, grassroots demonstration against the degradation of America’s natural resources.

April 22, 1970: 20 million people participate in inaugural Earth Day activities around the United States.

1970: Environmental advocacy group Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) founded. Today, the group has over 1 million members, a staff of over 300 scientists, lawyers and other specialists and offices in New York City, Beijing, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.

December 1970: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established by President Richard Nixon in order to protect human health and safeguard the natural environment— air, water and land. Before the agency was founded, “the federal government was not structured to make a coordinated attack on the pollutants that harm human health and degrade the environment,” according to EPA.gov. Today, the organization, which is based in Washington, D.C., has over 17,000 employees, 10 regional offices and more than 12 labs.

1971: Environmental activist organization Greenpeace founded. Today, the group, which has campaigned against nuclear power, whaling and global warming, among other issues, has offices in 40 countries around the world.

1972: Congress passes the Clean Water Act, which limits pollutants in rivers, lakes and streams.

1973: Congress passes the Endangered Species Act to protect animals and their ecosystems.

1980: After 18 years in the U.S. Senate, during which time he advocated for numerous environmental causes, Gaylord Nelson loses his race for a fourth-term in office. After leaving the Senate, Nelson becomes a counselor for The Wilderness Society, an environmental group.

1990: The 20th anniversary Earth Day celebrations go global, with participants in over 140 countries.

1995: Gaylord Nelson receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest award given to a civilian, in honor of his environmental work. President Bill Clinton says of Nelson: “As the father of Earth Day, he is the grandfather of all that grew out of that event.”

2000: Hundreds of millions of people in 184 countries celebrate the 30th anniversary of Earth Day, with a focus on “clean energy.”

July 3, 2005: Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson dies at age 89. His New York Times obituary notes that in addition to his Earth Day work, Nelson “was a principal sponsor of laws that preserved the 2,000-mile Appalachian Trail, established fuel efficiency standards in automobiles, sought to control damage from strip mining and led to a ban on the insecticide DDT.”

2007: Capacity crowds attend Green Apple Festival Earth Day events in New York City, San Francisco and Chicago. More than 40,000 people show up for Earth Day festivities at Chicago’s Lincoln Park Zoo, setting a single-day attendance record. Earth Day Network members host 10,000 Earth Day events around the world.

2010: In honor of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day a Climate Rally and Concert was held on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

See full article on History.com

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